BULGARI : Women's Watch of the Week

New Ladies Watch Arrival - The fusion of two iconic Bulgari designs: the Tubogas bracelet and the Lvcea watch.

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The Lvcea watch, from the Latin ‘lux’ for light, was first launched by Bulgari in 2014 and has swiftly become one of the house’s most successful women’s watches. Today, the Lvcea is presented on a Tubogas bracelet uniting two Bulgari signature designs.

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And now with the arrival of the Lvcea Tubogas, Bulgari melds its Roman design heritage with the Tubogas bracelet.  But what exactly is the Tubogas? Named for the humble gas pipe, the springy, coiling Tubogas bracelet was first seen in jewelry in the 1870’s where the serpent form, a staple of jewelry since Ancient Egypt, found a new look. Mimicking a stylised and very minimalist serpent, the mystifyingly clever construction of the Tubogas allows rows of smooth, springy, snake-like coils to wind up the arm.

The mechanics are Swiss made at Bulgari’s own manufacturing facility where each watch is made. The Lvcea Tubogas comes in two sizes: 28mm and 33mm with a stainless steel Tubogas bracelet and black lacquer dial or a stainless steel and rose gold Tubogas bracelet with a white mother-of-pearl dial. The most opulent is a 33mm rose gold model, with diamonds around the bezel and on the bracelet.

The larger size is powered by an in-house mechanical automatic-winding caliber and has a date window. The smaller sizes are quartz  and all have diamond hour markers and a pink cabochon-cut gemstone set into the crown. 

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BULGARI Tales: Save the Children 2018

SAVE THE CHILDREN 2018

BULGARI CEO Visits Za'atari Refugee Camp

BULGARI CEO, Jean-Christophe Babin, alongside Claudio Tesauro, President of Save the Children Italy, visited the Charity’s various humanitarian and education programs in Za’atari.
 
BULGARI and Save the Children strongly believe in the value of education and have been supporting Syrian refugee children in Jordan since 2014, with a key focus on pre-school children in Za’atari and, later, starting from 2017, in Azraq refugee camp. With an investment of over $3.7M so far, BULGARI and Save the Children have built or restructured 3 kindergartens in Za’atari.
 
Conceptualizing from a dream, nine years ago, BULGARI embarked on the partnership with an intention to empower the future of children, through education- a right, not a privilege. "Madereal” will be the new communication theme for the partnership, allowing for both BULGARI and Save the Children to share the stories of those who have been positively affected as a result of the partnership, thus proving that a dream can last forever, when it’s #madereal.

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Celebrities in BULGARI

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Global superstar Rihanna wearing BULGARI jewelry AND the Serpenti Watch to the worldwide premiere of Oceans 8 in New York on June 5th, 2018. 

 

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 Watch, Serpenti, 30 mm, Case Gold 6N 18kt 750, Bracelet Gold 6N 18kt 750, Hour-minute, Quartz, Diamonds-Stones Full setting, Diamond s 335 pce, Weight diamonds 7.94 [ct], Weight stones 2.22 [ct], Weight precious metal 66.9 [g], Waterproof 30 [m], Rubellite 31 pce

Watch, Serpenti, 30 mm, Case Gold 6N 18kt 750, Bracelet Gold 6N 18kt 750, Hour-minute, Quartz, Diamonds-Stones Full setting, Diamond s 335 pce, Weight diamonds 7.94 [ct], Weight stones 2.22 [ct], Weight precious metal 66.9 [g], Waterproof 30 [m], Rubellite 31 pce

  High Jewellery earrings in white and pink gold with 2 round brilliant cut diamonds (1.82 ct) and pavé diamonds (27.47 ct).

High Jewellery earrings in white and pink gold with 2 round brilliant cut diamonds (1.82 ct) and pavé diamonds (27.47 ct).

Pearl Buyer's Guide

 This collection includes a palette of beautiful cultured pearls. Besides round golden white loose cultured pearls, there’s a strand of well-matched round whites and a strand of oval pastel colors.

This collection includes a palette of beautiful cultured pearls. Besides round golden white loose cultured pearls, there’s a strand of well-matched round whites and a strand of oval pastel colors.

 Cultured pearls come in different sizes, shapes, and colors.

Cultured pearls come in different sizes, shapes, and colors.

PEARL DESCRIPTION:

Perhaps the best-loved gems of all time, pearls—both natural and modern cultured pearls—occur in a wide variety of colors. The most familiar colors are white and cream (a light yellowish brown). Black, gray, and silver are also fairly common, but the palette of pearl colors extends to every hue. The main color, or bodycolor, is often modified by additional colors called overtones, which are typically pink (sometimes called rosé), green, purple, or blue. Some pearls also show the iridescent phenomenon known as orient.

 This newly opened akoya pearl oyster reveals the cultured pearl that grew inside its gonad. This oyster’s scientific name is pinctada fucata (martensii).

This newly opened akoya pearl oyster reveals the cultured pearl that grew inside its gonad. This oyster’s scientific name is pinctada fucata (martensii).

Cultured pearls are popular for bead necklaces and bracelets, or mounted in solitaires, pairs, or clusters for use in earrings, rings, and pendants. Larger pearls with unusual shapes are popular with creative jewelry designers.

Pearl—natural or cultured—is a US birthstone for June, together with alexandrite and moonstone.

Natural pearls form in the bodies, or mantle tissue, of certain mollusks, usually around a microscopic irritant, and always without human help of any kind.

The growth of cultured pearls requires human intervention and care. Today, most of the mollusks used in the culturing process are raised specifically for that purpose, although some wild mollusks are still collected and used.

To begin the process, a skilled technician takes mantle tissue from a sacrificed mollusk of the same species and inserts a shell bead along with a small piece of mantle tissue into a host mollusk’s gonad, or several pieces of mantle tissue without beads into a host mollusk’s mantle. If a bead is used, the mantle tissue grows and forms a sac around it and secretes nacre inward and onto the bead to eventually form a cultured pearl. If no bead is used, nacre forms around the individual implanted mantle tissue pieces. Workers tend the mollusks until the cultured pearls are harvested.

There are four major types of cultured whole pearls:
 

  • Akoya—This type is most familiar to many jewelry customers. Japan and China both produce saltwater akoya cultured pearls.
  • South Sea—Australia, Indonesia, and the Philippines are leading sources of these saltwater cultured pearls.
  • Tahitian—Cultivated primarily around the islands of French Polynesia (the most familiar of these is Tahiti), these saltwater cultured pearls usually range from white to black.
  • Freshwater—These are usually cultured in freshwater lakes and ponds. They’re produced in a wide range of sizes, shapes, and colors. China and the US are the leading sources.
 Cultured pearls from Australia, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Myanmar, are grown in the Pinctada Maxima mollusk. This shell one is called gold-lipped because of the color of the outer rim of its mother-of-pearl layer.

Cultured pearls from Australia, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Myanmar, are grown in the Pinctada Maxima mollusk. This shell one is called gold-lipped because of the color of the outer rim of its mother-of-pearl layer.

 The black-lipped mollusk can produce a variety of cultured pearl colors. The color of the mother-of-pearl layer is often related to the color of the resulting cultured pearl’s nacre. - Courtesy A & Z Pearls and Tasaki Shinju Co

The black-lipped mollusk can produce a variety of cultured pearl colors. The color of the mother-of-pearl layer is often related to the color of the resulting cultured pearl’s nacre. - Courtesy A & Z Pearls and Tasaki Shinju Co

 The images in this chart represent typical ranges of size, shape, color, luster, surface, and nacre quality of akoya cultured pearls.

The images in this chart represent typical ranges of size, shape, color, luster, surface, and nacre quality of akoya cultured pearls.

 The images in this chart represent typical ranges of size, shape, color, luster, surface, and nacre quality of South Sea cultured pearls.

The images in this chart represent typical ranges of size, shape, color, luster, surface, and nacre quality of South Sea cultured pearls.

 The images in this chart represent typical ranges of size, shape, color, luster, surface, and nacre quality of Tahitian cultured pearls.

The images in this chart represent typical ranges of size, shape, color, luster, surface, and nacre quality of Tahitian cultured pearls.

 The images in this chart represent typical ranges of size, shape, color, luster, surface, and nacre quality of Chinese freshwater cultured pearls cultured pearls.

The images in this chart represent typical ranges of size, shape, color, luster, surface, and nacre quality of Chinese freshwater cultured pearls cultured pearls.

PEARL QUALITY FACTORS:

The qualities that determine the overall value of a natural or cultured pearl or a piece of pearl jewelry are size, shape, color, luster, surface quality, nacre quality, and—for jewelry with two or more pearls—matching.

Size: When other value factors are equal, larger pearls are rarer and more valuable than smaller pearls of the same type.
 

 The mollusk that produces South Sea cultured pearls is larger than the mollusk that produces Japanese saltwater cultured pearls. This leads to greater potential for larger sizes. 

The mollusk that produces South Sea cultured pearls is larger than the mollusk that produces Japanese saltwater cultured pearls. This leads to greater potential for larger sizes. 

 Cultured pearls come in a variety of sizes and South Sea cultured pearls are coveted for their large size. Different pearl types are held to different standards when classifying shape. Japanese saltwater cultured pearls are held to the strictest standards for shape. From top to bottom these strands are classified for shape as round, near-round, semi-baroque, and baroque.

Cultured pearls come in a variety of sizes and South Sea cultured pearls are coveted for their large size. Different pearl types are held to different standards when classifying shape. Japanese saltwater cultured pearls are held to the strictest standards for shape. From top to bottom these strands are classified for shape as round, near-round, semi-baroque, and baroque.

Shape: Round is the most difficult shape to culture, making it the rarest cultured pearl shape and—if all other factors are equal—also generally the most valuable. There are exceptions, though. Well-formed pear, oval, or baroque (irregularly shaped) cultured pearls are also prized by pearl lovers.

Color: Natural and cultured pearls occur in a broad range of hues. There are warm hues like yellow, orange, and pink, and cool hues like blue, green, and violet. Pearls have a wide range of tone from light to dark. Pearl colors tend to be muted, with a soft, subtle quality.

 These natural pearls from French Polynesia have a dark gray to black bodycolor. The middle pearl shows pink and green orient, while the overtone of the pearl on the left is mostly green.

These natural pearls from French Polynesia have a dark gray to black bodycolor. The middle pearl shows pink and green orient, while the overtone of the pearl on the left is mostly green.

Cultured pearls can come in a variety of amazing colors. These Tahitian saltwater cultured pearls have a color intensity that’s almost like neon lights. 

Pearl color can have three components. Bodycolor is the pearl’s dominant overall color. Overtone is one or more translucent colors that lie over a pearl’s bodycolor. And orient is a shimmer of iridescent rainbow colors on or just below a pearl’s surface. All pearls display bodycolor, but only some show overtone, orient, or both.

The law of supply and demand determines the value of certain pearl colors at any given time. If supplies of high-quality pearls displaying a preferred color are low, their prices can rise to unusually high levels. Other complex factors, like fashion trends and cultural traditions, can influence color preferences.

Luster: Of the seven pearl value factors, luster might be the most important. Luster is what gives a natural or cultured pearl its unique beauty.

  • Excellent – Reflections appear bright and sharp
  • Very Good – Reflections appear bright and near sharp
  • Good – Reflections are bright but not sharp, and slightly hazy around the edges
  • Fair – Reflections are weak and blurred
  • Poor – Reflections are dim and diffused

Within a pearl type, when other value factors are equal, the higher the luster, the more valuable the pearl.

Surface quality: Like colored stones, most pearls never achieve perfection. Some might show abrasions that look like a series of scratches on the surface, or a flattened section that doesn’t affect its basic shape, or an irregular ridge that looks like a crease or wrinkle.

If surface characteristics are numerous or severe, they can affect the durability of the pearl and severely depress its value. Surface characteristics have less effect on the pearl’s beauty and value if they are few in number, or if they are minor enough to be hidden by a drill-hole or mounting.

Nacre quality: Luster and nacre quality are closely related. If the nucleus is visible under the nacre, or if the pearl has a dull, chalky appearance, you can assume that the nacre is thin. This affects the luster as well as the durability of the pearl.

Matching: Jewelry designers sometimes deliberately mix colors, shapes, and sizes for unique effects, but for most pearl strands, earrings, or other multiple-pearl jewelry, the pearls should match in all the quality factors.

June's Birthstone: The Mysterious Organic Pearl

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Perhaps the best-loved gems of all time, pearls—natural and cultured—occur in a wide variety of colors. The most familiar are white and cream, but the palette of colors extends to every hue. Natural pearls form around a microscopic irritant in the bodies of certain mollusks. Cultured pearls are the result of the deliberate insertion of a bead or piece of tissue that the mollusk coats with nacre.

The main color, or bodycolor, is often modified by additional colors called overtones, which are typically pink (sometimes called rosé), green, purple, or blue. Some pearls also show the iridescent phenomenon known as orient.

People have coveted natural pearls as symbols of wealth and status for thousands of years. A Chinese historian recorded the oldest written mention of natural pearls in 2206 BC. As the centuries progressed toward modern times, desire for natural pearls remained strong. Members of royal families as well as wealthy citizens in Asia, Europe, and elsewhere treasure natural pearls and pass them from generation to generation.

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People have coveted natural pearls as symbols of wealth and status for thousands of years. A Chinese historian recorded the oldest written mention of natural pearls in 2206 BC. As the centuries progressed toward modern times, desire for natural pearls remained strong. Members of royal families as well as wealthy citizens in Asia, Europe, and elsewhere treasured natural pearls and passed them from generation to generation.

From those ancient times until the discovery of the New World in 1492, some of the outstanding sources of natural pearls were the Persian Gulf, the waters of Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), Chinese rivers and lakes, and the rivers of Europe.

During Christopher Columbus’s third (1498) and fourth (1502) voyages to the New World, he repeatedly encountered native people adorned with natural pearls. His discovery of natural pearl sources in the waters of present-day Venezuela and Panama intensified demand in Europe. However, within a hundred years, these natural pearl sources had declined due to overfishing, pearl culturing, plastic buttons, and oil drilling.

The first steps toward pearl culturing occurred hundreds of years ago in China, and Japanese pioneers successfully produced whole cultured pearls around the beginning of the twentieth century. These became commercially important in the 1920s (about the same time natural pearl production began to decline). From the 1930s through the 1980s, pearl culturing diversified and spread to various countries around the world.

Pearls are treasures from the Earth’s ponds, lakes, seas, and oceans, and they’ve always embodied the mystery, power, and life-sustaining nature of water.

The spherical shape of some pearls led many cultures to associate this gem with the moon. In ancient China, pearls were believed to guarantee protection from fire and fire-breathing dragons. In Europe, they symbolized modesty, chastity, and purity.

 High Jewellery Necklace in platinum with 1 Mozambique oval ruby (12.10 ct), 2 round brilliant marquise diamonds (2.07), 17 Akoya cultures Pearls, 42 buff top Rubies (4.03 ct), 24 trapezoidal cut diamonds (2.98 ct), 20 round brilliant cut diamonds (10.37 ct) and pavé-set diamonds (7.54 ct).  

High Jewellery Necklace in platinum with 1 Mozambique oval ruby (12.10 ct), 2 round brilliant marquise diamonds (2.07), 17 Akoya cultures Pearls, 42 buff top Rubies (4.03 ct), 24 trapezoidal cut diamonds (2.98 ct), 20 round brilliant cut diamonds (10.37 ct) and pavé-set diamonds (7.54 ct).
 

  High Jewellery necklace in platinum with 1 cushion Sri-Lanka sapphire (19,31 ct), 17 South-sea pearls, 82 beads emerald (53,90 ct), 9 beads sapphires (31,62 ct), 40 fancy diamonds and pavé (13,87 ct)

High Jewellery necklace in platinum with 1 cushion Sri-Lanka sapphire (19,31 ct), 17 South-sea pearls, 82 beads emerald (53,90 ct), 9 beads sapphires (31,62 ct), 40 fancy diamonds and pavé (13,87 ct)

  High Jewellery necklace in white gold with 17 pearls and pave diamonds (17,35 ct)

High Jewellery necklace in white gold with 17 pearls and pave diamonds (17,35 ct)

  High jewellery earrings in white  gold with 2 pearls,  4 round and pavè set diamonds (2.80 ct)

High jewellery earrings in white  gold with 2 pearls,  4 round and pavè set diamonds (2.80 ct)

  High Jewellery earrings in white gold with 12 Akoya Pearls, Emerald beads (19.63 ct), 10 Blue Sapphire beads (18.76 ct), round brilliant cut Diamonds and pave-set Diamonds (D – F IF – VVS 1.43 ct).

High Jewellery earrings in white gold with 12 Akoya Pearls, Emerald beads (19.63 ct), 10 Blue Sapphire beads (18.76 ct), round brilliant cut Diamonds and pave-set Diamonds (D – F IF – VVS 1.43 ct).

  High Jewellery earrings in pink gold with Mother of pearl, 2 round cut Rubellites (1.65 ct) and pave-set Diamonds (D – F  IF – VVS  0.95 ct)

High Jewellery earrings in pink gold with Mother of pearl, 2 round cut Rubellites (1.65 ct) and pave-set Diamonds (D – F  IF – VVS  0.95 ct)

  High Jewellery Earrings in pink gold with Sugilite and Pink Opal elements, 8 Akoya pearls, 4 double rose purple Quartzes-Amethyst (3,66ct), 4 double rose reddish Pink Tourmalines - Rubellite (4,54 ct) and 18 round brilliant cut Diamonds (IF - VVS - 2,48 ct).

High Jewellery Earrings in pink gold with Sugilite and Pink Opal elements, 8 Akoya pearls, 4 double rose purple Quartzes-Amethyst (3,66ct), 4 double rose reddish Pink Tourmalines - Rubellite (4,54 ct) and 18 round brilliant cut Diamonds (IF - VVS - 2,48 ct).

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Men's Watch News

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Classic yet innovative, OCTO men’s watch is a perfect blend of Bvlgari’s most iconic design trademarks, fusing a unique Roman-inspired octagonal shape with avant-garde Swiss technology.

After introducing the thinnest Tourbillon movement in 2014 and the Minute Repeater in 2016, Bvlgari has now launched OCTO Finissimo Automatic, a cutting-edge timepiece powered by the worlds thinnest self-winding movement BVL 138, developed and manufactured by Bvlgari in Le Sentier, Switzerland.

An Italian Affair is a visual journey through OCTO’s inspirational sources: drawing on Italian architectural masterpieces, the watch combines the Italian innate sense of aesthetics with the best of Swiss watchmaking expertise.

This is the essence of OCTO’s timeless allure: an iconic timepiece making a statement of distinctive creativity and exquisite craftsmanship.

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Download the special ROB Report on the Men’s Timepieces of the Year.

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Women's Watch News

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BULGARI's Serpenti watch has been coiling around the wrists of the most glamorous women since the 1940’s. The luxury watch has since taken on many guises to become one of the jeweller’s best selling designs as the snake – the symbol eternity – continues its reign in this opulent brand.  But there is more to the design than meets the eye, the clever coiling of the bands of gold of the bracelet allows it to glide onto the wrist and coil around the wrist with the ease of fabric. And of the course the BULGARI touch that brings glamour and opulence to even the most simple designs.

 

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BULGARI has added to their elaborate collection of Serpenti ladies watches that incorporate diamonds, precious metals and gems and creative designs a new watch called the Serpenti Misteriosi, which is based on the mythological amphisbaena – a snake with two heads, one at each end. 

The piece is made from 18-karat white gold and is covered with lavish diamonds. Of its two heads, one conceals within its mouth a watch with hour and minute functions.There pave diamonds on the body and the snake also boasts four emerald eyes. On both heads are small designs created from diamonds and emeralds.

Download the special ROB Report on the Women's Timepieces of the Year.

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Central to many of their high-end jewellery pieces over the years has been the distinctive symbol of the serpent, and it is the mythological creature that has served as the inspiration for its latest creation.

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As for its technical details, the watch is powered by a Bulgari B033 quartz movement, though this feels like something of an afterthought in light of its stunning appearance.

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Emerald Buyer's Guide

Color Is The Most Important Quality Factor For Emerald

Emerald has many special qualities, but colored stone professionals generally agree that emeralds are, most of all, about color. Emerald has been the standard for green among colored stones for thousands of years.

As with other colored stones, it requires a well-trained eye to recognize the sometimes subtle variations that make significant differences in emerald value. This is especially true in the higher qualities.

The most desirable emerald colors are bluish green to pure green, with vivid color saturation and tone that’s not too dark. The most-prized emeralds are highly transparent. Their color is evenly distributed, with no eye-visible color zoning. If the hue is too yellowish or too bluish, the stone is not emerald, but a different variety of beryl, and its value drops accordingly.

The intensity of the green in the finest emeralds might not be equaled by anything else in nature.

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Emerald appearance is sometimes associated with its mine location. Colombian emeralds are said to have a warmer and more intense pure green color. Zambian emeralds are said to have a cooler, more bluish green color. In spite of these theories, the truth is that emerald appearance overlaps between sources.

 A hand-held flashlight reveals the green color of a rough emerald from the Coscuez Emerald mine in Columbia.

A hand-held flashlight reveals the green color of a rough emerald from the Coscuez Emerald mine in Columbia.

Clarity Refers To The Inclusions

Emeralds typically contain inclusions that are visible to the unaided eye. Because of this, trade members and some consumers understand and accept the presence of inclusions in emeralds. Eye-clean emeralds are especially valuable because they’re so rare.

Cut Is One Of The Most Important Factors In Appearance

The most popular cut is the emerald shape due to the original shape of the crystals. Well cut stones maximize the beauty of the color while minimizing the impact of fissures, and creating a bright, lively stone.